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College Recruiting

The Athletics department has put together an extensive list outlining the College Recruiting process. If you’re interested in playing a college sport, this is an excellent place to begin. 

 
Welcome to the college recruiting section.  On this page, you will find valuable information as you begin your journey of continuing your playing career as a student-athlete. There are numerous opportunities for young women and young men to continue their athletic careers after high school. Opportunities exist in NCAA Division I, II, and III, NAIA, and NJCAA. The first step for students and parents should be to talk with your varsity head coach about the process. We are here to help you throughout the process.   

Check the links below to find out everything you ever wanted to know about college athletics and the recruiting process. 

The first step is to become familiar with the NCAA Clearinghouse (Eligibility Center). 

Instructions to Register for the NCAA Clearinghouse (Now Called the NCAA Eligibility Center) 

The NCAA Clearinghouse is an essential step in becoming eligible to play college sports. Over 180,000 potential college athletes register with the NCAA every year.  If you want to play NCAA college sports and receive a scholarship at the DI or DII level, you will need to register and be cleared by the NCAA. The Eligibility Center is the organization within the NCAA that determines the academic eligibility and amateur status for all NCAA DI and DII athletes. 

The First Step in Registering for the NCAA Eligibility Center is to Create Your Account 
 
https://web3.ncaa.org/ecwr3/  

All athletes will eventually create an account. It is best to create your account by the start of your junior year in high school to avoid getting caught it the backlog of athletes trying to get cleared at the end of the year. Once your account is created you will have several more steps to submit your transcripts, test scores and answer your amateur status questionnaire before you are finished. 

Once You Have Created Your Account Check Your Email and Log in to Finish the Registration Process 

NCAA Eligibility Center Mailing Address 

NCAA Eligibility Center 
P.O. Box 7136 
Indianapolis, IN 46207 

NCAA Division 1 core course requirements: 

  • 16 core courses 
  • Four Years of English 
  • Three years of Math (Algebra 1 or higher) 
  • Two years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it) 
  • One additional year of English, math or natural/physical science 
  • Two years of social science 
  • Four additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy 

NCAA Division II core course requirements:  

14 Core Courses: 

  • 3 years of English. 
  • 2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher). 
  • 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school). 
  • 2 years of additional English, mathematics or natural/physical science. 
  • 2 years of social science. 
  • 3 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy). 

Test Scores 

Division I have a sliding scale for test score and grade-point average. The sliding scale is available here. https://wcw.schoolloop.com/pf4/cms2/view_page?d=x&group_id=1531973553537&vdid=i11co24fa152z  

Division II has a minimum SAT score requirement of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. 

The SAT score used for NCAA purposes includes only the critical reading and math sections. The writing section of the SAT is not used. 

The ACT score used for NCAA purposes is a sum of the four sections on the ACT: English, mathematics, reading and science. 

All SAT and ACT scores must be reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center by the testing agency. Test scores that appear on transcripts will not be used. When registering for the SAT or ACT, use the Eligibility Center code of 9999 to make sure the score is reported to the Eligibility Center. 

Grade-Point Average 

Only core courses are used in the calculation of the grade-point average. 

Be sure to look at your high school’s list of NCAA-approved core courses on the Eligibility Center's Website to make certain that courses being taken have been approved as core courses. The Website is www.ncaaclearinghouse.net

Division I grade-point-average requirements are listed here. 

The Division II grade-point-average requirement is a minimum of 2.000. 

Important Recruiting Information 

 

http://www.nationalletter.org/  

http://www.nationalletter.org/signingDates/index.html  

 

https://www.ncaa.org/sports/2016/1/7/about-resources-media-center-ncaa-101-our-three-divisions.aspx  

 

https://play.mynaia.org/

https://www.wsj.com/articles/parents-can-invest-for-years-in-kids-sports-but-scholarships-are-elusive-11555848000?emailToken=2561613c1dd9124476c30c36ec5d42a7Vch8SbiPpUaNK0qA+GxpyIDaSVjnA/SVlR27f3vltdz/bz3qfLX6AOwH44mNfexSl1WNGDx9bidB9x6Pmy3kfZdUMC3RntH2S3jprIpAarPE6qNv579VI5CEfvuyS1y6IRv0dnFiy93KepxS1zpv/A%3D%3D&reflink=article_email_share

 

Guide for College Bound Student Athletes.pdf

Recruiting Articles and Videos 

 

Assessing a Recruit's Parent 

http://devzone.positivecoach.org/resource/video/assessing-recruits-parents  

 

The Dangers of Single Sport Athletes 

https://us2.campaign-archive.com/?e=61f720e307&u=d0fdff80ab034b4d6dfbbf0fa&id=69330118ae  

 

DO NOT PAY FOR RECRUITING SERVICES 

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Do+not+pay+for+a+recruiting+service%E2%80%A6  

 

Injury Rates Higher for Athletes Who Specialize

http://www.nfhs.org/articles/injury-rates-higher-for-athletes-who-specialize-in-one-sport/?mid=15483184&ml=360441  

 

LA TIMES: A Cautionary Tale of what can happen when a sport parent pushes too hard. 

https://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-sports-dad-plaschke-20170308-story.html  

 

Recruiting column: An interview with Clemson OC-Jeff Scott 

https://usatodayhss.com/2017/recruiting-column-interview-with-clemson-offensive-coordinator-jeff-scott  

Patrick Mahomes became NFLs Best QB by refusing to specialize in football 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2020/01/30/patrick-mahomes-became-nfls-best-quarterback-by-refusing-specialize-football/  

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/opinion/outlook/article/Parents-who-put-their-kids-in-sports-for-future-14899080.php?utm_campaign=CMS%20Sharing%20Tools%20(Premium)&utm_source=share-by-email&utm_medium=email  

SCHOOL Canceled